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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
striking coming from the number two republican in the united states senate. you also had senator inhofe on earlier, the top republican on the senate armed services committee says he is no, even before the hearing begins, bill. bill: thank you, mike. we're watching that. when chuck hagel begins his opening address we'll bring you there live. on the hill, mike emanuel. martha: well there is some new outrage from lawmakers after the white house suggests that it is republicans really that have held the u.s. economy back. white house press secretary jay carney says republicans are blocking progress being made on the u.s. economy. here is a bit of that. >> we have seen consistent job growth over almost three years. home prices are starting to climb back. consumer sentiment overall has been rising and consumer spending has been rising but there is more work to do and our economy is facing a major headwind which goes to your point and that is republicans in congress. martha: there you go. republican senator john thune responded on twitter. white house press secretary blames gop for the economy
the united states senate. and that's because despite the obvious frustrations of recent days and years, a frustration that we all share this place remains one of the most extraordinary institutions of any kind on the face of the earth. on occasion we all heard a senator leave here and take their leave condemning the senate for being broken, an impossible setting in which to try to do the people's business. well, i want to be very clear about my feelings. i do not believe the senate is broken. certainly not as an institution. there is nothing wrong with the senate that can't be fixed by what's right about the senate. the predominant and weighty notion that 100 american citizens chosen by their neighbors to serve from states is different as massachusetts and montana can always choose to put parochial or personal interests aside and find the national interest. i believe it is the honor of a lifetime, an extraordinary privilege to have represented the commonwealth of massachusetts and the united states senate for more than 28 years. what a remarkable gift it has been to carry the banner of
of nebraska in the united states senate i cast over 3,000 votes. hundreds of committee votes. i have also a given hundreds of interviews and speeches and written a book. so as you all know, i am on the record. i am on the record on many issues, but no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me. my beliefs, my record. my overall world view has never changed. that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world, that we must lead in the international community to confront threats and challenges together. and take advantage of opportunities together. that we must use all our tools of american power to protect our citizens and our interests. >> i want to bring in dana bash from capitol hill along with fran townsend who's back with us here. dana, give us a sense of the mood and tone in the hearing so far. do we think he's doing well in terms of convincing critics that he's the guy for the job? >> he's certainly trying. but he definitely has critics on a whole host of issues. we knew that going into it. they are not being shy about voi
was called a nuclear option in the united states senate. a lot of people don't appreciate how important it was for us to get that done. and chuck schumer and i and others and dick durbin were involved in a bipartisan effort to avert that. thanks to the cooperation of our two leaders we were able to do that. there is a desire for bipartisanship in this. i think we can show the country and the world that we're capable of tackling this issue and moving a terrible issue that has to be resolved in a bipartisan basis and i believe the majority of the american people support such an effort and i want to thank my colleagues again and the ever congenial senator schumer. >> now we'll have even more congenial senator durbin. >> i want to thank my colleagues. john mccain, thanks, we're been down this road before, but i feel very good about our chances this time. chuck, thank you for your leadership on this, i'm sure that marco and bob and lindsey and i understand that you've been the force behind, he's the glue and you're the force and it's worked. we've come to this moment and here we are facing t
know, i know a senator from the utah who wrote a memo to the president of the united states after he got elected and said this is a nixon goes to china moment for you. >> which senator from utah would this have been? >> the junior senator. >> which president would this have been? >> the newly elected one. >> i see. >> instead this is the nixon goes to china moment for you. because if you can be the first democratic president in history to say we have to do something about entitlements, you can build enough political capital that you can then do whatever you want in health care or environment or energy or anything else. >> so there's momentum building for something big? something to solve the problem. i want to hear you talking to one another about what that would be. >> the business community, i believe, let me just say would applaud this. in fact, if we knew that there was a real bipartisan push for infrastructure spending, it might help us keep two factories open. however -- >> really? >> absolutely. because it would be -- it would be work. it would be work. we need tractors. we ne
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)